The Need for Action

 The MAP will develop a set of near-term policy changes or transportation demand management (TDM) programs that maximize the benefits of planned infrastructure projects and address inequitable mobility outcomes along US-101. These improvements will respond to five foundational problems:

Travel Time on US-101 is unpredictable

US-101 is not moving as many people as it could be

Worsening Congestion limits access for all

US-101 causes public health burdens and mobility constraints for nearby communities

Congestion, unpredictability, and limited transit options present mobility challenges for all, but some groups are more vulnerable

Problem: Travel time on US-101 is unpredictable

Travelers driving on US-101 have to add 25-55% more time to arrive at their destination predictably. Buffer Time Index (BTI) is a measure of the amount of time above the average travel time that a driver needs to assume for an on-time arrival at the desired destination.

US-101 Northbound Buffer Time Index

Source: MTC Vital Signs

Problem: US-101 is not moving as many people as it could be

Current traffic conditions mean that even high occupancy vehicles like buses, shuttles and carpools must travel at slow speeds along with the single occupancy vehicles. During the morning and afternoon peak travel periods, 3% of vehicles  carry 20% of the passengers on US-101 today. 

Vehicles and Passengers on US-101

Assumes 30 Passengers per Bus and 8 Passengers per Vanpool

Source: MTC

Problem: Worsening congestion limits access for all

Regionally, commuters experience nearly twice as much delay today as they did in 1998—US-101 is no exception. Not only does congestion make travel more difficult, expensive, and unpleasant, it limits access for everyone. When US-101 is congested, it puts jobs, services, friends, family, and activities out of reach.

Regional Highway Congestion

Source: MTC Vital Signs

Problem: US-101 causes public health burdens and mobility constraints for nearby communities

Living close to US-101 presents a variety of unique problems for residents. In addition to the health impacts caused by auto congestion and air pollution, the highway itself can be a barrier that limits access and makes biking and walking difficult or unsafe.

Asthma Rates in the Bay Area

Source: California OEHHA CalEnvioScreen 3.0

Problem: Congestion, unpredictability, and limited transit options present mobility challenges for all, but some groups are more vulnerable

Without flexibility to arrive late or adjust schedules to avoid congestion, some groups are more vulnerable to travel disruptions. Hourly-wage and shift-based workers may lose a job or wages due to tardiness. Low-income households tend to spend a greater share of their income on transportation. Parents and caregivers pay fees for every minute they are late for pick-up. Students with set class times may miss key education opportunities.

Daily Vehicle Hours of Delay

Source: The Pew Charitable Trusts, 2016

Mobility Action Plan Goals

The ideal US-101 corridor serves the region equitably
in service to three goals:

Offer reliable travel times for all people, regardless of how they travel

Prioritize high-capacity mobility options for all

Foster healthy and sustainable communities along its right-of-way

Goal: Offer reliable travel times for travelers on US-101

Ensuring reliable travel times helps corridor workers and residents arrive on time to jobs, services, and other destinations. When a corridor is unreliable, travelers may have to add “buffer” time to their trip to avoid being late. This has the greatest impact on low-wage employees working hourly or shift jobs, which typically require stricter schedules and start times than higher-paid salary positions.

Daily Vehicle Hours of Delay

Source: Silicon Valley Indicators

Goal: Prioritize high-capacity mobility options

Vehicle capacity is the number of people that can fit inside a vehicle. Higher-capacity vehicles, such as buses or trains, can move many more people than single-occupancy cars while using a similar amount of space on the road. Prioritizing higher-capacity mobility options and protecting those vehicles from congestion helps use the corridor more efficiently. Improving the occupancy of personal vehicles by encouraging carpools also helps increase the capacity of the corridor to move more people.

Regional Transit Ridership

Source: Silicon Valley Indicators

Goal: Foster healthy and sustainable communities

Heavily traveled highways such as US-101 are significant sources of air pollution, including greenhouse gas emissions. Vehicles entering and exiting freeway access points can pose a danger to people walking and biking, particularly when there are limited and inadequate facilities to cross the highway.

Traffic Density

Source: California OEHHA CalEnvioScreen 3.0

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